Nicknames are a sign of affection in most cultures. I just got back from a 6-week trip to the US. I’m rarely away from my dogs for that long and I realized just how many names I call them during our conversations. As a solitary writer, I speak to my dogs more than anyone. If the amount of Spanglish and other assorted nicknames is any indication of how much I love them, I love them muchísimo. Here’s a list of them so far.

*In Spanish, itos and citos (pronounced eeto or seeto) make words diminutives.

A nice afternoon napping in the garden. #dogsofinstagram

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Lele (Lay-lay) the Rottweiler

Lele

Lelle (sounds like bell)

Le (lay)

Lelito

Lele-butt

Stinkbutt

Fartypants

Slobberface

Boogerface

Piglet

Frankenpaw (he had a cancerous toe amputated last year)

Uke-lele (the new fave coined by The Husband)

Teri says ruff #nationaldogday

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Teri el tinaquero (mongrel)

Teri

Teri-head

Teri-pie

Ter

The Ter

Ter-ter

Bone (he was a bony rescue dog)

Bony

Bone-bone-cito

The Bone

Bony-bone-bone

Tericito

Milky Dog (I tried to fatten him up with milk when I first got him. He loves it to this day)

Chicken in a biscuit (what he smells like)

Teri taco (he fluffs his bed into a taco shape)

 



Collectively

The Pups

The Boys

The Woo-woos

The Woos

The Kids

Pup-pups

Dog-dogs

Pup-pupcitos

Dog-dogcitos

Puppykins

Poochies

Poochiekins

 

I’m sure there are more names if I keep paying attention.

How many nicknames do you have for you pets? 

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